Pottery

Kathleen Scavone

Kathy Scavone’s pottery incorporates elements of the natural world of beautiful Lake County into her wheel-thrown stoneware pottery.

Lake County Diamonds, those unique volcanic semi-precious stones are placed on her hand- crafted pots like a necklace, to set off the rich claywork and glazes.

Native wood, such as manzanita is integrated onto her pottery work adding a warm touch to stoneware jars and other ware.

Moon Tears Pot

The Lake County Museum says:  “Lake County diamonds were  called “Moon Tears” because they are supposed to be the tears the Moon shed when she fell in love with a young Pomo Chieften and her brother the Sun made her go back into the sky. Lake County Diamonds were placed on burial mounds by some tribes to protect the spirits of the newly departed from evil spirits or demons, who love the darkness and when they saw the ‘moon tears’  would think the moon was shining and go away.

Lake County diamonds are semi-precious stones of volcanic origin found nowhere else in the world. They have a rating of 7.8- 8 on the Moh’s scale of hardness as compared to real diamonds that are rated at 10. Lake County diamonds have been used commercially and industrially and are capable of cutting glass.”

Mt. Konocti “Volcano Pottery”

I have created this Mt. Konocti Volcano Pottery in honor of our county’s interesting geologic past. Our county’s namesake, Clearlake is positioned between two faults, a graben,  which is common in volcanic areas. Mt. Konocti, the sentinel of the lake, is actually a volcanic composite cone which was built up of lava flows. This highly mineralized zone bubbles up in the form of a large Soda Spring in Clear Lake.

As Pomo Indian legend has it, the hot springs were formed by a despairing Indian named Princess Lupiyoma. There were also two giants, Kah-bel of Bartlett Mountain and Konocti. Kah-bel was in love with Konocti’s daughter, Lupiyoma. Konocti was angry at this pronouncement and the two giants began to hurl boulders at one another across the water. A large rock struck Kah-bel with great force, killing him and sending his blood down the mountain. The stains are evident in the red color of Mt. Konocti even today. Konocti soon died of wounds sustained in the battle as well. The Princess’ many tears which were spilled over the deaths of her loved ones formed Borax Lake, or Lake Hach-inhama. In her grief, she threw herself into Clear Lake or Ka-ba-tin and sank, causing the bubbles to rise at Soda Bay.

Manzanita Pot

Manzanita is a native California plant whose name is a Spanish word meaning “little apple”. This moniker is derived from the edible, tiny fruit which is a small, red berry. California Native Americans incorporated the Manzanita berry into their rich and varied diet as a tea.

Manzanita boasts elongated, deep burgundy limbs which are smooth, graceful and sometimes wildly twisted, much like driftwood. Scientists say that when it loses its curling bark it is employing a natural defense against insect infestation. The striking curls of bark resemble thin cinnamon sticks.

The manzanita which adorns my stoneware pottery was found on the ground in my garden, then polished by my husband, Tom, a woodworker.

Moon Pot

Stoneware MOON pots mimic the over 180 moons of our solar system!
Moons have: odd shapes, canyons, water oceans, craters and are half-bright/half-dark.
Did you know Jupiter has 69 moons, and Saturn has 62? Uranus has 27!

Beach Glass and Repurposed Glass Pottery

I have adorned my pottery with beach glass "necklaces". Some pottery incorporates repurposed glass from bottles.

Pots with Beads

If you liked these, maybe you would enjoy some of my photography.


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